LNG Maritime Transportation and Utilisation By Keith W. Hutchinson & David Dobson




Description



TUESDAY 12 FEBRUARY 2019

 “LNG MARITIME TRANSPORTATION AND UTILISATION”

By:

KEITH W HUTCHINSON, BEng(Hons) CEng CMarEng FRINA FIMAREST FSNAME

CONSULTANT, SAFINAH LTD.

and

DAVID C DOBSON, BSc(Hons) MBA CEng FRINA

MARKET SECTOR MANAGER, SAFINAH LTD.

 

Meeting to be held at

Lloyds Register, 71 Fenchurch Street, London EC3M 4BS

at 17:30 for 18:15 hours (duration approximately 1 hour)

There is a continuing growth in the application of natural gas for onshore electrical power generation, industrial and domestic consumption and now as a fuel for coastal and deep-sea shipping.  Hence, natural gas is increasingly being transhipped in its cooled transitory form of Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG), primarily via sea utilising ultra large and conventionally sized LNG Carriers (LNGCs) but increasingly also now by smaller coastal LNGCs and LNG Bunker Vessels (LNGBVs) / Gas Supply Vessels (GSVs).  Because of these factors there is a significant and rising demand for various frame sizes of, from small-scale to ultra-large, floating LNG reception, storage and utilisation facilities, such as LNG Floating Storage and Offloading (LNG FSOs) reception / distribution vessels, Floating, Storage and Regasification Units (FSRUs), LNG Floating Power Barges (LNGFPBs) or ships, etc.

Small-scale to ultra-large nearshore moored floating LNG assets can inherently provide a supply of LNG and natural gas or electrical power to locations, and ships, where traditional (fixed) land-based infrastructures are either uneconomic, prohibited by geographical or geological issues, or where demand is only temporary or seasonal.  Propelled LNGBVs can also supply fuel to the rapidly increasing number of LNG gas fuelled ships.  The speed with which floating LNG assets can be brought into commercial operation favours applications where there is a short mobilisation schedule or execution demands.  Locations particularly suitable for floating LNG include the small or emerging markets of island and coastal states, communities / facilities not connected to an existing ‘national grid’ of gas pipelines, and isolated industrial or power-generating plants (for instance, gas-fuelled power stations).  Hence, floating LNG is a particularly cost-effective vehicle for providing LNG and natural gas to market and facilitates solutions that are low-risk, flexible and inherently able to readily adapt to changing market conditions.

The speakers will consider the development and increasing deployment of small-scale, conventional and ultra-large floating LNG supply and utilisation chain options, namely ships and moored floating LNG assets, worldwide.                   

ALL ARE WELCOME

Continuing Professional Development (CPD) Certificates will be available at the end of the meeting for attendees, if requested in advance. 

When:  Feb 12, 2019 from 6:15 PM to 7:30 PM (GMT)
Associated with  Western Europe

Contact

Lourdes Elona-Lilley
+44 7479639770
snamewes16@gmail.com